Clinical Connections

MA Professional Development & Clinical Training Summer 2017 Recap

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Wow! Where has the time gone? Summer 2017 is finished, and we want you to take a look at what the Professional Development & Clinical Training departments did for and with our students at Encino, Irvine, and West LA. From Clinical Connections to Private Practice Visits to New Student Meetings to Practicum Preparation trainings, our department has contributed to the growth of our students with 10 total events held at all campuses. We really love what we do!

The Professional Development and Clinical Training Department continues to focus on planning and executing enriching events for the students in the MACLP and MAP tracks.

Irvine Graduate Campus

 New students were welcomed during the summer to the Irvine Graduate Campus with Quick Meets. It is during these series of one-on-one meetings that students receive an overview of the departments’ role, as well as information about practicum basics for MFT students. The purpose of the meeting is to ignite excitement within the new student, and ensure they feel a part of the Pepperdine community.

Our first event for the summer was a visit from Dr. Bob Hohenstein, who is the Program Director for the PRYDE, which stands for Pepperdine Resource, Youth Diversion, and Education. PRYDE serves as “a prevention, intervention, and counseling program for at-risk youth and their families.” Dr. Hohenstein’s visit allowed students to learn about available practicum opportunities for the fall semester.

As we do every summer, the MA Professional Development & Clinical Training department treated students to annual OC-CAMFT Celebrate Everything MFT luncheon. Students were treated to a beautiful lunch at the Costa Mesa Country. There was representation from all schools with an MFT program in the Orange County, and the Pepperdine delegation represented well. From Compassion Fatigue to Self-Care was the topic for the afternoon, presented by Gina Tabrizy. Gina Tabrizy took the time to interject comedy into her presentation, while encouraging the room full of future MFTs to find space for self-care.

For the month of August, the department extended an invitation to the California Association of Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors (CALPCC). Our department partnered with Dr. Jerriann Peters pre-practicum class, providing students the opportunity to gain a greater understandings of obtaining dual licensing. Dr. David Adams, shared his experience with the association from a legislative perspective, as well as identifying the benefits of being an LPCC.

At the end of each summer term, Kathleen Wenger, manager of the Professional Development & Clinical Training department open the doors of her Laguna Beach private practice. Students were able to learn about building a private practice, understanding the challenges and benefits of having a private practice.

The MFT Consortium of Orange County continues to be held at the Irvine Graduate Campus on the third Wednesday of every other month. The next scheduled meetings are scheduled for September 20 and November 15. For the past 20 years, I have been the host and co-chair of the MFT Consortium. This is a collaborative setting that brings together mental health agencies and universities with MFT graduate programs in an effort to foster community partnerships. The meetings serve as a networking opportunity for agencies to be connected with key personnel to discuss MFT employment and practicum training opportunities, programming and clinical training concerns.

West Los Angeles Graduate Campus

 As we do every semester, we held the Practicum Tips Meeting, Pep Pro Demo and the Intern Registration Meeting to help MACLP students along their practicum journey.

Macy Grim, MS, a Professional Clinical Counseling Intern, presented the summer Clinical Connections workshop at the West LA campus on “Play Therapy in Practice.” Macy did a beautiful job of giving a history of pay therapy and the use in modern practice. She provided useful tips and examples that highlighted the efficacy of play therapy. Attendees were grateful for her approach and vast knowledge in the subject. One attendee remarked, “Macy’s presentation was really informative and organized. I could have stayed for many more hours and she would have kept my attention the whole time!”

Encino Graduate Campus

 Summer term started with Quick Meets and the New Student meeting in May. In June and July we had our Practicum Tips meeting, the Intern Registration meeting as well as The Road to Licensure and Licensing Examination information meetings.

For our special event at the end of July, the Encino Graduate Campus invited three Alumni back to speak to current students about their “Life After Pepperdine” and their journey after graduation. Three students who went in three different directions told their story and answered questions from current students. The alumni provided valuable advice about the decisions they made as well as the challenges and opportunities they found in post-degree life. Student feedback: “this was amazing, I learned so much, thank you!”, “my favorite part was hearing about how they managed the details of life and kept it all together”, “I learned so much, thank you for having this”.

On behalf of Alice Richardson, Rebecca Reed, Sheila Sayani, and myself, I thank you for your ongoing support of our department. Please let me know if you are interested in speaking at one of our Clinical Connections events, hosting a Private Practice Visit, or have any other ideas that could benefit our students.

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Recap of This Year So Far — See You At Our Fall Events!

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by Kathleen Wenger, M.A., LMFT, LPCC, Manager M.A. Psychology Professional Development and Clinical Training

Summer is relatively slow in the M.A. Psychology Department of Professional Development and Clinical Training as we plan for an exciting series of fall events. So I wanted to take this opportunity to fill you in about some of the enriching events for students in the MAP and MACLP tracks that we’ve had so far this year and encourage you to attend the events that we host this fall! In addition to these events, there are several resources that help guide you through the practicum experience. You can make an appointment for a Quick Meet to receive a personalized explanation of the events and services offered by the department and to have any questions about practicum answered. If you want more information about an agency, you can stop by the GA’s office to read through students’ practicum site reviews (strengths and challenges). We also encourage you to use the Mentor Program, which puts you in contact with a student who has experience at a site you are interested in.

Irvine Graduate Campus

As we do each semester, we welcomed new students to the Irvine Graduate Campus with Quick Meets, our series of one-on-one meetings with new students. These personalized explanations of our departments’ events and services, as well as an overview of practicum basics for MFT students and other subjects of concern for individuals new to the program help our new students to dive right into their program prepared for success.

In February we hosted a Clinical Connections event with George Nalbach, Ph.D. and Connie Saindon, author of The Murder Survivor’s Handbook. Dr. Nalbach introduced a couple whose son was tragically murdered several years ago to share their experience with the grief and loss process. Connie provided clinical strategies for working with clients who have experienced similar tragedies. Attendees felt honored to hear the couple’s story and to receive valuable tips for working with clients who have experienced the violent loss of loved ones. One individual summed up the evening’s event by stating that “While the content and discussion was heavy, saddening, and emotional, I felt most impacted and moved by the display of human resiliency and growth. It was inspiring to hear this couple’s journey through their grief and loss, what they have learned about the process, and what they have learned about themselves.”

In February we also hosted the annual GSEP Career and Practicum Fair: Career Connections. This event gave our current students and alumni an opportunity to meet with potential practicum and internship employers. We had an outstanding turnout in terms of attendees as well as agencies – approximately 50-60 students and alums met with fifteen of the top mental health agencies in Orange County! We followed this event with the annual Practicum Mentor Fair in March. At the Mentor Fair, students ready to begin practicum had an opportunity to hear about the experiences current practicum students have had at their agencies.

Our popular Private Practice and Agency Visit series continued with two events in Orange County in March. I hosted a visit at my practice in Laguna Beach and Chris Hoff, LMFT, hosted one at his agency in Costa Mesa, the California Family Institute. One attendee at my event commented that he felt “put right at ease to ask many questions about the nuts and bolts of starting, managing, and maintaining a private practice such as this. We were also able to discuss other business aspects such as marketing tools, networking, and even google analytics to ensure that we will have enough clients to keep our businesses afloat, yet not so many that we ourselves start to drown and lose our effectiveness.”

As we do every semester, we held a New Student Meeting, the Practicum Tips Meeting, and the Intern Registration Meeting to help MACLP students along their practicum journey. Students have responded to this semester’s series of meetings by telling us things like “it is so great that the program goes the extra mile for us like this” compared to other similar programs! It’s a great vote of confidence to know the impact that we’re having on our current students.

The MFT Consortium of Orange County continues to be held at the Irvine Graduate Campus on the third Wednesday of every other month. The next scheduled meetings are scheduled for September 16 and November 18. For the past 20 years, I have been the host and co-chair of the MFT Consortium. This is a collaborative setting that brings together mental health agencies and universities with MFT graduate programs in an effort to foster community partnerships. The meetings serve as a networking opportunity for agencies to be connected with key personnel to discuss MFT employment and practicum training opportunities, programming and clinical training concerns.

West Los Angeles Graduate Campus

West LA started its spring semester with a Clinical Connections topic that we all need to visit often. Alumna Juanita Frassini Goode, MA, presented, “Self-Love Your Way through Life: The Clinical Value of Practicing Self-Love for Yourself and Clients.” Juanita’s workshop was very fun and interactive. Attendees engaged in a variety of self-love activities with the multitude of art supplies that Juanita provided. Juanita shared her unique approach to practicing with clients, which included her approach from her license in spiritual psychology.  Participants left feeling excited to try out some of these new ideas and approaches with clients.

Following Juanita’s workshop on self-love, premarital counseling guru, Debbi Molnar, MA, LMFT, LPCC, spoke about, “Premarital Counseling versus Couples Therapy: Understanding the Difference and Making it Work in Your Practice.” With a beautiful manual that Debbi put together, she very clearly explained the differences between the two. Debbi shared with the audience how her sessions with couples therapy look, versus how her sessions with premarital counseling look.  She also spoke about the programs for couples that she has put together, which she often holds as weekend workshops. Debbi’s impressive experience and background was very apparent and attendees walked away with an organized and clear-cut way to practice premarital counseling versus couples therapy.

Jody Echegaray, Psy.D, presented the last of the Clinical Connections workshops. Jody’s workshop, entitled “Mass Media—Its Effects, Motivations for Use, and Media-based Clinical Interventions” proved to be a very important topic amongst clinicians. Jody gave a quick historical timeline on the development of media and how it has come to play a part in the practice of psychotherapy. Jody also provided great examples of interventions he has used with his own clients. The workshop addressed some very poignant issues that media can both harm and help in the practice of psychotherapy. Participants were very impressed by the amount of information and were very intrigued by the topic.

West LA’s other professional development events included a Coffee Talk by Alice Richardson, MA, LMFT, LPCC and a Private Practice Visit to alum Curt Widhalm’s practice. For the Coffee Talk, Alice answered questions about pursuing the LPCC. While the development of the license in California is still new, many students and alums struggle with knowing much about it. Alice, who has pursued the license, shared her impressive knowledge about the license and its benefits. Students who attended felt grateful for the clarifications.  Later in March, students and alums visited Curt’s practice to learn about the development and running of a private practice. The room was full as Curt spoke about his process to private practice and laying it out straight for how it goes. Attendees felt very informed and lucky to have attended this private practice field trip.

Encino Graduate Campus

This spring, the Encino Graduate Campus was pleased to have Kent Toussaint, LMFT, LPCC, speak at a Clinical Connections about “The 1-2-3’s for Treating Resistant Teens.” Kent gave attendees a better understanding of how to build rapport, earn trust, and create alliances with teens.  He also spoke about the developmental needs of teens, and how unconditional positive regard helps with this age group.  At the end of Kent’s presentation, the attendees had a hands-on demonstration of the games and toys Kent uses for ice-breakers and rapport building.

In March, Dr. Dennis Lowe graciously gave a 3-hour presentation about “What’s New in the DSM-5” for Pepperdine Alumni who are studying for the licensing exam.  This presentation was held on a Saturday afternoon, and was well received by all attendees.  Many alumni attended and seemed engaged and interested in this presentation, and some alumni even sent emails and notes of appreciation.

March is National Gambling Awareness Month, and the Encino Graduate Campus was fortunate to have an Alumna who specializes in Gambling Addiction. Audrey Johnson, PsyD, LMFT, spoke about the differences between recreational gambling and gambling addictions.  Between 3% and 6% of the general population is impacted by some degree of problem gambling.  Audrey spoke about helpful tools, assessment inventories and treatment plans she uses with her problem gambling clients.

Also in March, Sheila Sayani and Alice Richardson organized a Practicum Mentor Fair “Mixer” where seasoned students who are near graduating spoke with students taking the Pre-Practicum class.  The students enjoyed this event immensely and we plan to continue doing these mixers in future semesters.

Alice Richardson, Clinical Training & Professional Development Coordinator, spoke about the LPCC License at “Coffee Talks” at both Encino and WLA Campuses.  Encino also presented New Student Meetings, Tips for Practicum Meetings and an Intern Registration Meeting, which all three campuses present every semester to keep students as informed as we can.

A Powerful Clinical Connections Event: Family Survivors who have Lost a Loved One Due to Violent Death

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by Kalina Preston

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On Friday, February 27th a group of 30 students and alumni from Pepperdine and surrounding schools, gathered to hear Family Survivors Who Have Lost a Loved One Due to Violent Death a moving presentation by IGC adjunct faculty member George Nalbach, Ph.D and Connie Saindon, LMFT. Dr. Nalbach introduced a couple whose son was tragically murdered several years ago. The couple graciously agreed to join the presentation, and briefly shared their experience through their grief and loss.

Connie Saindon, LMFT, author of “Murder Survivor’s Handbook” and one of the few specialists in the field of violent death bereavement shared her extensive knowledge and experiences with individuals and families affected by murder. Connie shed light on the lack of resources for not only murder survivors but for therapists that may have client’s facing this tragic event.  Connie briefly summarized her Handbook, and shared clinical strategies to help client’s with their grieving process and different coping tools. Connie discussed and presented the Restorative Retelling Model.

As a listener, I was moved and impacted by the couple’s story and appreciative of their willingness to share their story and personal experience. While the content and discussion was heavy, saddening, and emotional, I felt most impacted and moved by the display of human resiliency and growth. It was inspiring to hear this couple’s journey through their grief and loss, what they have learned about the process, and what they have learned about themselves.

Irvine Graduate Campus — M.A. Psychology Fall 2014 Recap

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We kicked off the semester at the Irvine Graduate Campus with the latest installment of Quick Meets, our series of one-on-one meetings with new students. Pioneered at the Irvine campus, Quick Meets now takes place at West LA and Encino in addition to Irvine. By providing personalized explanations of our departments’ events and services, as well as an overview of practicum basics for MFT students and other subjects of concern for individuals new to the program, we help new students to dive right into their program with information about many of the tools that will be important to their success.

At the Irvine Graduate Campus, we started off the Fall semester with New MACLP Student Meetings and Practicum meetings. In October, we also had Dennis Lowe, Ph.D. present to students, alumni, and the public about the new DSM-5. Attendees praised the event with positive reviews, saying the presentation was interesting and informative. Dr. Lowe helped make the DSM-5 and its changes easy to understand. Kathleen Wenger also held a Coffee Talk to discuss the LPCC license, which was a helpful event for students to learn the differences between LMFT and LPCC.

In November, we held a Clinical Connections event with Dr. Edward Shafranske where he spoke on Attending to Mentalization in Psychotherapy.  Originally developed for the treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder, Dr. Shafranske focused on the treatment’s expansion to any clients whose self-reflective capacity has been compromised and interventions to re-engage clients in mentalization. As usual, Dr. Shafranske was able to take complicated material and make it accessible to all attendees, whether new graduate students or seasoned therapists. Dr. Shafranske spoke at the very first Clinical Connections back in 2003 and we are grateful for all of his support over the years!

The spring session promises to be as lively as the fall! On February 5, 2014, IGC will host the annual GSEP Career and Practicum Fair: Career Connections. This annual event provides current students and alumni to meet with a number of potential practicum and internships site employers. IGC will have approximately 15 mental health agencies for students to meet with, including some represented by Pepperdine alumni!

In February, IGC will host a Clinical Connections event with Dr. George Nalbach and honored guests focusing on treatment for people who have just lost a loved one through a violent death. Dr. Nalbach and IGC will welcome past clients who have experienced the loss of their son to share their therapy and support group experience, including what was helpful and not helpful in throughout their journey. The program will include a panel discussion as well as a question and answer segment.

The MFT Consortium of Orange County continues to be held at IGC on the third Wednesday of every other month. For the Fall semester, IGC held these meetings in September and November. The next scheduled meetings are scheduled for January 21st and March 18th. For the past 20 years, Kathleen Wenger continues to host and co-chair the MFT consortium in a collaborative setting for mental health agencies and universities with MFT graduate programs, in an effort to foster community partnerships. The meetings serve as a networking opportunity for agencies to be connected with key personnel to discuss MFT employment and practicum training opportunities, programming and clinical training concerns. BBS rules and regulations are also covered.

IGC is also scheduling Coffee Talks, as well as two more Clinical Connections events to be announced at the beginning of the Spring Semester. We will continue to provide our regularly scheduled Clinical Training Meetings at all three campuses (New Student, Preparing for Practicum and Intern Registration Meetings). The department is looking forward to the spring upcoming events!

December Clinical Connections with George Nalbach, Ph.D. — The Future of Psychotherapy: The Primacy of Empathy and the Seduction of Evidence Based Treatment

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For the December 6 Clinical Connections at the Irvine Graduate Campus, popular long-time Pepperdine faculty George Nalbach, Ph.D., presented on the history, present status, and future of psychotherapy. Dr. Nalbach, the Associate Executive Director of Santa Anita Family Service, discussed his concerns regarding the current standardization of therapy inevitable with third party reimbursement. He also critiqued the plethora of “evidence based treatments” research and literature and the evolving standardization of graduate education. In contrast to these issues, Dr. Nalbach reintroduced the prioritization of empathy as the indispensable tool of psychotherapy fact finding and the central aspect of psychotherapy effectiveness.

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Tips for Working with Trauma from Sandy Hume

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The November 1, 2013, edition of Clinical Connections at the Irvine Graduate Campus featured Sandy Hume, LMFT’s presentation on working with adults with complex trauma.

In her presentation to an audience of students and practitioners, Sandy explored the attachment research that is the underpinning of the contemporary understanding of complex trauma. Secure infants/children learn to trust how they feel and the world, to understand feelings, make decisions and take action. They develop a complex vocabulary to describe their emotions: “I can regulate myself, make good decisions, take action, communicate what I need and get help.” When this security is undermined by a chronic experience of physical, emotional, or educational neglect or abuse, however, complex trauma can result.

Developmental/chronic trauma interferes with neurobiological development, specifically the capacity to integrate sensory, emotional, and cognitive information into a coherent whole. Adults with developmental trauma often:

  • Desire safety — they do not feel safe, so they engage in behaviors that create a perception of safety. For example, perfectionists order every detail of their lives down to the most minute aspect in order to feel safe.
  • Feel overwhelmed and experience affect regulation issues.
  • Have issues with trust and discernment,
  • Have learned to be overly pleasing and/or rejecting when it comes to people. For clinicians, notice someone’s interpersonal intensity reaches inappropriate levels. Were they left alone early on to deal with their experiences?
  • Are hypervigalent.
  • Self-blame in order to continue loving someone who should have been protective. When you organize your world around someone who is abusive to you, you feel like you have to make it your fault in order to survive.

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Developmental trauma coping mechanisms that you may find in a client with complex trauma include:

  • Fight/flight/freeze responses
  • What is a freeze response? In wild, it’s playing dead in the face of a predator. In people it often takes the form of dissociation.
  • ADHD from trauma? “You’re not living up to your potential” is a common misunderstanding of the situation.
  • Repression of terror are helplessness.
  • Amazing resilience, resourcefulness, and talent.

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Regardless of theoretical orientation or technique (CBT, psychodynamic, and EMDR are all common and empirically supported), the goals of working with complex trauma clients are similar. They include helping clients to:

  • Learn how to respond effectively in the here and now.
  • Regain control of their emotional responses
  • Integrate traumatic memories into the larger perspective as historical rather than current or future.
  • Feel in charge of their lives.
  • Reduce feelings of shame.
  • Set better boundaries.
  • Choose mutual relationships in their lives, rather than relationships that are a one way street.
  • Express their feelings and needs and ask for help.
  • Deal with the disappointment that comes from understanding that no one is coming to be the perfect parent or other person that they never had (thinking this is how people get into bad relationships).
  • Learn how to modulate feelings and responses.
  • Build their ability to self soothe and experience containment – for example, through journaling, exercising, tolerating unpleasant emotion until it passes, reaching out for support, etc.
  • Understand emotions as cues rather than defaulting to fight/flight/freeze instincts.
  • Utilize breathing techniques to bring the calming parasympathetic nervous system online.
  • Verbalize feelings and associated meanings to create context.